Category Archives: Philosophy and Science

The Gettier Problem in the Philosophy of Science.

Philosophy of science has a curious relationship to epistemology, or the theory of knowledge. There is little doubt that in the 20th century the philosophy of science took on a life of its own largely independent of epistemology. Interestingly, given … Continue reading

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Who Was David Hume? A Rationalist, of course!

One must grant a belated happy birthday to David Hume (May 07, 1711), one of history’s most insightful thinkers and a favoured philosopher of mine despite the conservatism that is often associated with him. Gottlieb, in a timely review of … Continue reading

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Uniqueness and Mediocrity: The Multiverse and the Conflict between the Copernican and Anthropic Principles

The concept of the multiverse takes advantage of two principles, namely the Copernican Principle and the Anthropic Principle. This is intriguing for Carter introduced the Anthropic Principle as a reaction to the Copernican Principle. The Copernican Principle states that the … Continue reading

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Kuhnian Anomalies and Evolutionary Thought

One thing that interests me is the question of anomalies and the structure of scientific revolutions as per Thomas Kuhn. We tend to associate anomalies and revolutionary science with the physical sciences, most especially physics. This is unsurprising because ours … Continue reading

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Peak Knowledge and Social Complexity: Are They Linked?

The New York Times carries a thought provoking op-ed by William Gail on what he refers to as a looming new scientific dark age. Let us put aside the quibble that the dark ages might not have been as dark … Continue reading

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Logic and Mind: The Poverty of Adaptation and the Philosophy of Logic Naturalised

One often comes across many “just so stories” in the context of human evolution. One field that has, or perhaps had, almost turned this into an art form is evolutionary epistemology. Take say the following just so story, typical of … Continue reading

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Forms at Home in the Universe: On Two Problems of Body

The mind-body problem we are familiar with, so let us not tally with this too much; at least, not yet. There is another problem of body, most famously formulated by Eugene Wigner, in his oft cited paper on the “unreasonable … Continue reading

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Self and Emancipation

Former Prime Minister Paul Keating, in many ways the most significant architect of neoliberal Australia, not long ago told a gathering of school students, from Melbourne Grammar no less, that “In the last 30 or 40 years, the quest for … Continue reading

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Chomsky’s Merge, Einstein’s Dice, and Schrödinger’s Cat

One of the world’s leading defenders and exponents of what Adam Smith referred to as “the vile maxim of the masters of mankind” has an interesting little review of the latest scientific work of one of that maxim’s leading critics, … Continue reading

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